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fr Aquatic Biomonitoring in the Ring of Fir

Vanessa Bourne, Vale Living with Lakes Centre, Laurentian University

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The Ring of Fire in the Far North of Ontario is considered to be one of the most promising mineral development opportunities in Ontario in almost a century. Covering an area of about 5,000 km² in two Ecozones, recent estimates suggest that the Ring of Fire holds significant potential production of nickel, copper and platinum as well as potential for world-class multi-generational production of chromite.
To monitor the potential environmental impacts of future mining on this near pristine area we are collecting baseline stream data of aquatic organisms and water chemistry before the mine is developed. My project focuses on understanding how conditions of our sites naturally vary seasonally and between ecozones. Understand this will allow us to compare pre-mining conditions to post-mining conditions, which in the future will be pivotal to grasping how the Ring of Fire development is impacting the surrounding aquatic environment.

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Aquatic Biomonitoring in the Ring of Fir

Vanessa Bourne, Vale Living with Lakes Centre, Laurentian University

LINK TO VIDEO
VIDEO
DESCRIPTION

The Ring of Fire in the Far North of Ontario is considered to be one of the most promising mineral development opportunities in Ontario in almost a century. Covering an area of about 5,000 km² in two Ecozones, recent estimates suggest that the Ring of Fire holds significant potential production of nickel, copper and platinum as well as potential for world-class multi-generational production of chromite.
To monitor the potential environmental impacts of future mining on this near pristine area we are collecting baseline stream data of aquatic organisms and water chemistry before the mine is developed. My project focuses on understanding how conditions of our sites naturally vary seasonally and between ecozones. Understand this will allow us to compare pre-mining conditions to post-mining conditions, which in the future will be pivotal to grasping how the Ring of Fire development is impacting the surrounding aquatic environment.

TITLE

Aquatic Biomonitoring in the Ring of Fir

Vanessa Bourne, Vale Living with Lakes Centre, Laurentian University

LINK TO VIDEO
VIDEO
DESCRIPTION

The Ring of Fire in the Far North of Ontario is considered to be one of the most promising mineral development opportunities in Ontario in almost a century. Covering an area of about 5,000 km² in two Ecozones, recent estimates suggest that the Ring of Fire holds significant potential production of nickel, copper and platinum as well as potential for world-class multi-generational production of chromite.
To monitor the potential environmental impacts of future mining on this near pristine area we are collecting baseline stream data of aquatic organisms and water chemistry before the mine is developed. My project focuses on understanding how conditions of our sites naturally vary seasonally and between ecozones. Understand this will allow us to compare pre-mining conditions to post-mining conditions, which in the future will be pivotal to grasping how the Ring of Fire development is impacting the surrounding aquatic environment.

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try LINK TO VIDEO
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